AWARENESS OF SAVING ONE MILLION LIVES PROGRAMME FOR RESULTS AMONG WOMEN OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE AND THE APPLICATION OF DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS THEORY IN ACCELERATING ADOPTION OF THE PROGRAMME IN BAYELSA STATE, NIGERIA

Authors

  • Abisoye Sunday Oyeyemi Niger Delta University http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8455-7591
  • stella Ufuoma Rotifa Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa
  • Obioma Obiora Obikeze Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa
  • Ulunma Ikwuoma Mariere Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State

Keywords:

awareness, adoption, diffusion, innovation, SOML PforR

Abstract

Background: Saving One Million Lives Program for Results (SOML PforR) is a relatively new intervention designed to improve maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine awareness of SOML PforR and discuss the application of Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory to accelerate adoption of the programme.

Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in all the 105 wards in the eight local government areas (LGAs) of Bayelsa State, Nigeria. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from a random sample of 1250 women of reproductive age residing in communities where facilities offering SOML PforR services were located. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise the quantitative variables. The association between categorical variables was determined using Chi‑square test. Binary logistic regression was done to determine predictors of awareness of SOML in the state.

Results: Data were analysed for 1223 women. The mean age (standard deviation) of the women was 28.5 (6.8) years. Most (81.8%) participants were married/cohabiting and 77.1% had at least secondary education. Only 7% of the women had heard about SOML PforR with radio as the predominant source of information (61.2%). Education was the only predictor of awareness among the women (Adjusted OR=2.26, 95%CI 1.03-4.95).

Conclusion: Awareness of SOML PforR was poor despite several months of implementation. Engaging early adopters and use of appropriate communication channels can accelerate adoption of the programme.

Author Biographies

Abisoye Sunday Oyeyemi, Niger Delta University

A self-motivated academic and public health physician, displeased with the current state of health of his people and determined to acquire the requisite  expertise to enable him contribute to efforts aimed at controlling diseases, especially diseases of poverty limiting the well-being and optimum productivity of the people of his country and continent.

stella Ufuoma Rotifa, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa

 

Department of Community Medicine, Consultant 

Obioma Obiora Obikeze, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa

Department of Community Medicine, Consultant

 

Ulunma Ikwuoma Mariere, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State

Department of Community Medicine, Consultant

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Published

2022-06-30

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