Association of Serum S100b with Prognostic Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

https://www.doi.org/10.60787/tnhj-753

Authors

  • Ajala AO Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife.
  • Ajose OA Department of Chemical Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria
  • Komolafe MA Department of Internal Medicine (Neurology unit), Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria
  • Adedeji TA Department of Chemical Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria
  • Omisore AD Department of Radiology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria
  • Busuyi SJ Department of Chemical Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria
  • Tajudin AA Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology unit), Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria

Keywords:

Stroke, Brain ischemia, NIHSS: National institute of Health Stroke Scale, mRS: modified Rankin Score, Biomarkers

Abstract

 

Background: Stroke is a life-threatening neurological condition due to impairment in blood supply to the brain. In addition to clinical acumen, diagnosis and monitoring of stroke requires technical radiological imaging procedures. Researchers have sought serum biomarkers to aid the diagnosis and monitoring of stroke patients.

Method: Serum S100B was measured in 33 patients with acute ischemic stroke to evaluate its relationship with prognostic factors in stroke: severity estimated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcome evaluated using the modified Rankin score (mRS), and infarct volume on computed tomography (CT) scan.

Background: Stroke is a life-threatening neurological condition due to impairment in blood supply to the brain. In addition to clinical acumen, diagnosis and monitoring of stroke requires technical radiological imaging procedures. Researchers have sought serum biomarkers to aid the diagnosis and monitoring of stroke patients.

Method: Serum S100B was measured in 33 patients with acute ischemic stroke to evaluate its relationship with prognostic factors in stroke: severity estimated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcome evaluated using the modified Rankin score (mRS), and infarct volume on computed tomography (CT) scan.

Result: A population of 33 test subjects with stroke were recruited into the study together with apparently healthy age and gender matched control subjects. S100B was assayed in all the participants with an Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay method (ELISA). The stroke patients were assigned NIHSS scores; functional outcome was assessed using the mRS. Infarct volume on CT scan was measured with the scanner volumetry program.

Conclusion: Elevated serum S100B is associated with increased clinical severity in acute ischemic stroke patients. S100B may thus be a suitable biomarker for monitoring patients with ischemic stroke.

Result: A population of 33 test subjects with stroke were recruited into the study together with apparently healthy age and gender matched control subjects. S100B was assayed in all the participants with an Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay method (ELISA). The stroke patients were assigned NIHSS scores; functional outcome was assessed using the mRS. Infarct volume on CT scan was measured with the scanner volumetry program.

Conclusion: Elevated serum S100B is associated with increased clinical severity in acute ischemic stroke patients. S100B may thus be a suitable biomarker for monitoring patients with ischemic stroke.

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Published

2024-01-15

How to Cite

Ajala, A., Ajose, O. A., Komolafe, M. A., Adedeji, T. A., Omisore, A. D., Busuyi, S. J., & Tajudin, A. A. (2024). Association of Serum S100b with Prognostic Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria: https://www.doi.org/10.60787/tnhj-753. The Nigerian Health Journal, 23(4), 961–967. Retrieved from https://tnhjph.com/index.php/tnhj/article/view/753

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