The prevalence and predictors of abdominal massage among pregnant women attending antenatal care at the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, Okolobiri, Nigeria

Abednigo Ojanerohan Addah, Isa Ayuba Ibrahim, Eugene Maduabuchukwu Ikeanyi

Abstract


Background: Abdominal massage (AM) is an age-long cultural practice among pregnant women in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. With its attendant complications it is a major contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality. This study investigates its current prevalence and determinants among pregnant women attending Antenatal clinic(ANC) in the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, Okolobiri, Nigeria.

 Methods: Using a self-administered, structured questionnaire data was collected from 319 pregnant women randomly selected from women attending ANC in the hospital. The prevalence of AM was defined by proportion of women who ever had AM in pregnancy. The predictors of the occurrence of AM were identified using binary logistic regression.  

 Results: Majority of respondents were urban settlers (70.5%), multiparous (60.2%), self-employed women (41.7%) with secondary education as highest educational attainment (48.6%). The prevalence of AM was 70.5%. Pain in past labors was the most common reason for seeking AM (42.3%) and also the most frequent complication in labor (5.0%) following AM. The predictors of AM identified include husband support (OR – 4.91; 95% CI: 2.93 – 25.89;p – 0.006), when source of information is parents (OR – 6.92; 95% CI: 3.46 – 135.85;p < 0.001) and relatives (OR – 17.05; 95% CI: 2.17 – 134.2; p – 0.007). Ethnicity and highest level of education were also identified as predictors of AM.

 Conclusion: Findings from this study shows that AM is a deep-rooted cultural practice that is supported by established traditional institutions like elders and the family unit among the Ijaw ethnic extraction in Nigeria. 


Keywords


Abdominal massage, Traditional Birth Attendants, Niger Delta, Skilled Providers, Maternal mortality

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Constraints in the study.

Therere are not many studies of abdominal massage to use as references.

Conflict of interest: there are no conflict of interests for any of the authors of this study. The authors single handedly sponsored the study without outside helptionsj


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ISSN: 1597-4292

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